Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction

According to Wikipedia, symphysis pubis dysfunction (SPD) is a condition found in 1 in 300 pregnancies (although some estimates are higher). It is characterised by pain and discomfort in the front of the pelvis. Movement such as sitting or walking may be difficult and sleep may be affected. The pubic symphysis is the joint where left and right pelvic bones join. This is prone to strain during the heavy loading of pregnancy and childbirth. It has been suggested that the hormones of pregnancy may cause this joint to widen.

Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction In Pregnancy

Pelvic support belts and prescribed medication are the most common treatments for SPD, which usually spontaneously resolves after childbirth. Specialist physiotherapy may also be of benefit. Sufferers are advised to be careful of heavy lifting, avoid stepping over things and being careful of twisting movements of the body.

Acupuncture And SPD

I have treated this condition on numerous occasions and found that the pain usually resolves very quickly with acupuncture. Needles are carefully inserted according to where the pain is situated, most often along the top of the pubic bone. I acknowledge that such treatment requires complete confidence in the acupuncturist, but believe me the results are worthwhile.

Naturally care must be taken with any treatment in pregnancy, but if you are considering acupuncture for your SPD you should seek the advice of a fully trained acupuncturist, such as a member of The British Acupuncture Council.

 

www.acupuncturepaincentre.co.uk

Mindfulness and Meditation With Buddhify

How things have changed! The art of meditation, once the realm of hippies and buddhists is now mainstream, rebranded as mindfulness. This is a basically the art of being in the here and now, and is the mental equivalent of going to the gym. Benefits are said to include reduced stress, better focus and improved sleep.

I have been testing a new kid on the block. Buddhify is available for Android and iOS smartphones, and according to its authors :-

“is the most convenient, best value and most beautiful meditation app available today. It is helping people around the world reduce stress, be present & get better sleep in even the most busy of lifestyles. Peace of mind for just the price of a cup of coffee with no hidden or additional costs.”

Mindfulness and Meditation With Buddhify

When you first open up the app’s colourful wheel (see picture), you are confronted with a series of choices based on your current activity. These include going to sleep, working online or eating. For example, ‘waiting around’ brings up 3 meditation options ‘stereo’, ‘curious’ and ‘base’. Ranging from 5 to 11 minutes in length these are audio tracks which will take you through a range of guided lessons based around this scenario. The tracks are thoughtful and relevant to modern living – a lifetime away from the ‘imagine you are in a meadow’ meditations of yesteryear.

According to its authors, Buddhify comprises “over 80 custom made meditations for wherever you are”.

Altogether I found listening to Buddhify a surprisingly pleasant and thought provoking activity. The voices are very pleasant to listen to – both male and female – and not an American accent anywhere! For these reasons I have been recommending Buddhify to some of my stressed acupuncture patients, and the feedback so far has been positive.

Buddhify website

Acupuncture Review Finds Evidence Of Effect

Acupuncture Review Finds Evidence Of Effect

Acupuncture Review Finds Evidence Of Effect

What Is Acupuncture Good For?

I am often asked which conditions acupuncture is good for. A recent review commissioned by the Australian Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Association, provides an up to date evidence based guide to the effectiveness of acupuncture using scientifically rigorous methods.

In this study they considered 122 different health conditions and assigned them to one of four categories –

  • Positive effect (8)
  • Potential positive effect (38)
  • No evidence of effect (5)
  • Unclear/insufficient (71)

For the eight best supported conditions the evidence was consistently positive and acupuncture was recommended by the review authors. The eight conditions are:-

  • allergic rhinitis
  • back pain (chronic)
  • headache (tension type, chronic) and migraine
  • knee osteoarthritis
  • nausea and vomiting (either postoperative or due to chemotherapy)
  • post operative pain

The ‘potential positive effect’ list of 38 conditions includes neck, elbow, heel and shoulder pain, asthma, IBS, anxiety, depression, insomnia. It also includes primary and secondary stroke treatment. This is a condition which is the most common inpatient indication for acupuncture in Chinese hospitals.

Acupuncture Review Finds Evidence Of Effect

To be clear, no evidence of effect does not mean that acupuncture is ineffective, rather that there is currently no evidence of effect. These results reflect only what research has been done to date, they are not neccesarily a good indication of how someone would get on with acupuncture in normal practice. Interestingly however, the study authors do point out that :-

“it is no longer possible to say that the effectiveness of acupuncture is because of the placebo effect, or that it is useful only for musculoskeletal pain”.

Read the study

{Based on an article by Mark Bovey, Research Manager British Acupuncture Council}.

Topic: Acupuncture Review Finds Evidence Of Effect

Cupping As A Form Of Deep Tissue Massage

What Is It Good For?

What is cupping therapy and what is it good for? According to The British Acupuncture Council it is where ‘glass cups with a vacuum seal are placed on the skin to stimulate blood flow and clear stagnant qi’.

Cupping As A Form Of Deep Tissue MassageIn essence it can help with pain, inflammation, blood flow, relaxation and well-being. We could also consider cupping as a form of deep tissue massage.

Not New

The cups can be fashioned from bamboo, glass, plastic or earthenware. Cupping is by no means a new phenomenon. According to The Academy of Classical Oriental Sciences, ‘the earliest record of cupping is in the Bo Shu (an ancient book written on silk), which was discovered in a tomb of the Han Dynasty [206-220 AD]. Several other ancient texts mention Chinese medicine cupping. Several centuries later another famous medical classic, Su Sen Liang Fang, recorded an effective cure for chronic cough and the successful treatment of poisonous snake bites using cupping therapy’.

The modern cupping practitioner creates a partial vacuum using a lit taper, and the cup is placed on the skin. Sometimes a mechanical pump is used instead.

Cupping As A Form Of Deep Tissue MassageSo how does it work? I like to explain it to my patients in this way.

The partial vacuum created inside the cups causes the skin within to be pulled up and to redden (see illustration), indicating that additional blood is flowing into this area. The effect is, I explain similar to deep tissue massage, and can be helpful in treating muscle injury and stiffness. Where a larger muscle area requires treatment, a little massage oil applied to the skin first will allow the cup to be moved around the affected zone. This draws blood to the area and ‘walks’ it along the muscle.

In clinical practice I will use cupping most often in treating lower

Cupping As A Form Of Deep Tissue Massage

Cupping therapy – removing cups from a patient’s back

back pain, shoulder tension and in respiratory conditions such as the common cold (in which case it is applied on the upper back behind the lungs).

And finally here is a story to illustrate how cupping can be of benefit to athletes.

Marathon Treatment

Three days prior to running a marathon, a lady came to me with a muscle tear in her calf. She could barely walk. Could I achieve the impossible and help her to compete? After assessing her, I oiled up the affected area and attached a cup. Sliding this along the muscle allowed me to improve local blood flow until the area was visibly red. I advised her to rest totally for 24 hours before recommencing running. And the result? She was thrilled to complete the marathon (though not in her best time).

And finally, you may have seen photographs of athletes with painful-looking round ring marks on their torsos as a result of this treatment. ‘Not for me’ do I hear you say? I clearly advise patients that surface marking may occur for a few days after cupping, and that there should be no accompanying pain as a result. The marks will always disappear. If carried out by a competent, trained practitioner cupping therapy should be safe and effective.

Cupping. A form of deep tissue massage for treating pain, inflammation, improving blood flow, relaxation and well-being.

 

A New Way To Pay Your Acupuncturist

In the last few years the way we carry out financial transactions has changed beyond recognition. Contactless cards, on-line banking, paperless transactions, ping-it, bitcoin etc. The list is seemingly endless.A New Way To Pay Your Acupuncturist

According to Payments UK 500m personal cheques were written in 2015, and though banks are now promising to process them for as long as they are needed, this total was 13% lower than in 2014. They are still a popular way of paying tradespeople, charities and friends/family.

So enter the newcomer – paym. This works by linking your mobile number to your bank account. Simple. There’s no annoying sort codes or account numbers and because you get it straight from your bank or building society, it’s safe and straightforward.

So here’s how to pay a small business or individual using paym (assuming they are set up to receive payments as described above).
According to paym.co.uk ‘to send a payment, just log in to your existing mobile banking or payment app. Select a friend’s number using your contacts or enter a mobile number manually. No sort code or account number needed. Enter the amount you want to pay. Paym lets you check the name of the person you’re paying, so you can be sure you’re sending it to the right place. Confirm the name of the person you are paying, press send and your app will confirm your payment has been sent straight away’.Simple and easy.
 Paym, a new way to pay your acupuncturist.

Martin Dean is an acupuncturist with over 23 years practice experience who practices in Nottingham. As a forward thinking small business owner he is pleased to accept paym transactions.

. www.acupuncturepaincentre.co.uk

The Four Pillars of Health

What are the four pillars of health and how can they help us? Dr Rangan Chatterjee, 38, a GP from Oldham, and presenter of the BBC’s ‘Doctor In The House’ series was recently interviewed on the BBC Breakfast TV sofa. He asserted that most GPs these days are too busy to properly investigate complicated medical conditions, and it is therefore much easier to prescribe a pill. As part of his TV experiment Dr Chatterjee was allowed the luxury of spending time with patients in their home environment. As a consequence he was better able to get to the bottom of their medical issues, with some heartwarming outcomes.Four pillars of health

The four pillars he described are:-

  • Eating
  • Moving
  • Sleeping
  • Relaxing

It all sounds too easy, but what can we really learn from this approach? We are bombarded with health messages on a daily basis. Which ones should we really pay attention to? Let us take a look at each pillar in turn.

Nearly every day there is a new story in the media about healthy eating, which frankly can be really confusing. For me the key questions are about how often you eat freshly cooked food? Perhaps convenience wins over quality. Are do you allow adequate time to ‘rest and digest’ at mealtimes?

Have you ever had a conversation with your GP or practice nurse about taking more exercise? What was the outcome? Perhaps you started with good intentions but something more important came along.

four pillars of healthAnd on the topic of rest, the sleep council (http://www.sleepcouncil.org.uk/) notes that ‘nearly half of us are getting just six hours sleep or less a night. And an alarming four out of five people complain of disturbed or inadequate – or ‘toxic’ – sleep’. Go to their website for answers to these and other sleep related issues.

According to an online dictionary, the word relax means ‘to make or become less tense or anxious, to make (a rule or restriction) less strict’. Which rule could you relax? For all you schedulers out there, do you ever pencil in R & R breaks?

Here is a tip to make your four pillars work for you. I like to score each one from one to ten (where ten is perfect), and then write alongside each score one action I can take that will improve my score. Go on and have a go.

Martin Dean is an acupuncturist with over 23 years practice experience who practices in Nottingham. www.acupuncturepaincentre.co.uk

Cordyceps Mushrooms For Endurance

For quite a while I have been hearing good things about cordyceps mushrooms, and specifically Cordyceps Sinensis (and the related Cordyceps Militaris) – that it can help with stamina and endurance, and can improve male sperm quality. So what is the truth?

This fungus grows on specific caterpillars in the higher mountain regions of China. Once the province of the wealthy due to its rarity, cordyceps can now be grown in the laboratory under less gruesome conditions. For this reason it is becoming more widely accepted as the price has come down to affordable levels.Cordyceps Mushrooms For Endurance

In China this prized herb has been in continous use for several centuries. In this context it has been used to warm and tonify the kidneys (with a particular action on sore lumbar back and knees) and invigorate the lung to ease breathing difficulties. It is also said to dissolve phlegm. In Tibet it is specifically used for weakness and fatigue.

Cordyceps species contains all of the essential 18 amino acids, vitamins E, K, B1, B2 and B12, polysaccharides, proteins, sterols, nucleosides, macro- and microelements (K, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, Pi, Se, Al, Si, Ni, Sr, Ti, Cr, Ga, V and Zr).

I was particularly interested in its effect on poor sperm quality. In traditional Chinese medicine this is often attributed to a weakness of the kidneys. A trial on 90 laboratory rats given Cordyceps Militaris (American Journal of Chinese Medicine, 2008) showed a significant improvement in both sperm count and motility. Another trial published in the same journal the year before showed a similar effect in a small group of subfertile boars. Both trials suggested that the effect peaked at about 6 weeks, and lasted for at least two weeks after discontinuing the supplementation.

Other research has shown that cordyceps has very low toxicity, though its safety is unproven in pregnancy. Although I could find no formal trials of cordyceps in humans (though research does confirm other pharmalogical effects) , the research on animals seem to reinforce the sperm boosting properties traditionally attributed to Cordyceps by Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Acupuncture Dosage Explained

According to wiktionary.org the word ‘dosage’ is defined as the administration of a medication etc, in a measured amount. So what might the measured amount be in an acupuncture treatment?

Acupuncture Dosage Explained

Acupuncture Dosage Explained

To help answer this question I went to the checklist at STRICTA.info (which offers reporting guidelines for acupuncture researchers). According to this some of the factors that can affect treatment strength are:-

  • Number of treatment points used
  • Depth of insertion
  • Amount of stimulation applied to the needle
  • Needle retention time
  • Needle thickness
  • Total number of treatment sessions
  • Frequency of sessions
  • Style of acupuncture (eg Western medical, Chinese, Japanese, Korean)
  • Any additional interventions offered (eg cupping, moxibustion)

In my experience, one treatment is usually insufficient – a larger dose is often needed. After all, you don’t expect to take just one tablet after a visit to your GP.

In a 2008 paper, Dr. Adrian White also argued that ‘the dose may be affected by the state of the patient (eg nervous, immune and endocrine systems); different doses may be required for different conditions’. It has been argued by others that where trials have shown little or no effect over placebo, this is due to an insufficient dose of acupuncture being given.

So how do we establish the correct dose? In clinical practice, this is usually determined by experience. I would generally give a smaller dose of treatment on the first visit, and also if you have a weaker constitution. Whilst it is normal to experience a little drowsiness after an acupuncture session, extended periods of drowsiness or sleeplessness may indicate too high a treatment dose. Over treatment is usually self-resolving in a few days at most and is not generally considered a safety issue. If you experience side-effects please discuss these with your acupuncturist.

As a patient you should always ask your practitioner how many sessions are anticipated and he/she should agree one or two treatment goals at the outset (eg significantly reduce PMS symptoms). In establishing a correct dosage I usually combine clinical experience with information gained from studies.

Martin Dean B. Eng Lic. Ac MBAcC has over 23 years clinical experience as an acupuncturist, with over 10 years teaching experience.

 

Why I Love My Job

Patients often pick up that I really enjoy my work. This got me to thinking what it is about the practice of Acupuncture that fires me up.

why I love my jobFirstly I have to say that this ancient approach to wellness didn’t come about overnight. Constant development of ideas by Chinese thinkers and doctors over more than two millenia has given us a wide-ranging system of medicine that rather thoughtfully tries to explain what it is to be human with all our faults. It is about real people’s lives. And such a system naturally requires constant study and updating by the modern practitioner. It also draws to the attention of the acupuncturist – the agent of change –  the need for self-development.

In a week where the daylight coming through the window has begun to take on a warmer hue and the very air sounds different, I am remined how we advanced human beings are still affected by the relentless march of the seasons. As it is without us, so it is within.

The ‘Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Medicine’, much of which predates the birth of Christ, describes in detail how we are affected by seasonal variations, and guides us in working hand-in-hand with nature. I am blessed to be able to pass on some of this wisdom as I understand it. Amongst my patients, farmers are the group most readily able to relate to this concept, with their close association with the land. All too often the solution to seasonal variations in how we feel inside is to turn up the heating, switch the electric lighting on and carry on with our normal routines. The enlightened soul might perhaps modify his/her behaviour according to the specific nature of each season.

So being an acupuncture practitioner isn’t neccesarily an easy job. And patients don’t always get better, or respond according to textbook theory. It would be surprising if they did! But many do and this is a regular reward that never grows dim. In truth attention to detail and careful use of the senses – sight, listening , touch and even smell – can go a long way towards allowing us to better understand each other.

The way of healing is so profound. It is deep as the oceans and boundless as the skies. How many truly know it?

If only we were perfect!

 

 

Introducing The Moxa Family

I have written about moxa before. Just to recap, and quoting from The British Acupuncture Council from their website,

Moxibustion is an essential part of Chinese medicine. This involves moxa, a substance prepared from mugwort leaves (Artemisia vulgaris), being placed either directly on the skin, on top of an acupuncture needle or held just above the skin, usually over specific acupuncture points or meridians. The herb is lit and as it smoulders slowly, the heat permeates the skin and affects the flow of “qi” (energy) and blood in the area being treated.

Most people find its gentle warming properties soothing and very effective. Whilst many people will recognise that acupuncturists use needles, it is an open secret that we also use moxa. It is perhaps helpful to think of moxa as a form of dry heat (as opposed to a hot water bottle, wheat bag or hot shower which is damp-heat). If your condition is improved by the application of heat then you may find moxa helpful. Your trusty acupuncturist will be able to advise.

What I wanted to do here is to highlight a number of different types of moxa available on the market, and illustrate the strengths of each. Just to be clear, they (nearly) all contain mugwort leaves. The difference is in the packaging.

Moxa Roll (Or Stick)

moxa stickThis type is available in a cigar form which makes it easy for home use. It can be held close to the skin to warm acupuncture points and specific areas. With sciatic pain it is often helpful to warm the affected nerve area creating a so-called ‘red-stripe’.

 

Moxa Cones

moxa conesIn this form the mugwort is rolled into cones and placed directly on the acupuncture point. It is lit and allowed to smoulder. It is of course removed before reaching the skin so that a pleasant feeling of warmth remains. This approach may be used in conjunction with needle insertion (after swabbing the skin of course). Watch a video.

Moxa On Needle

moxa on needleIn this application a small stub of moxa roll is threaded onto the end of a needle. When lit the heat is both radiated to the surrounding tissues and conducted down the metal of the needle to warm and soften underlying tissues. In the illustration the technique is being used to reduce inflammation and improve circulation in an injured knee.

Mini Moxa

mini moxaSo called ‘mini moxa’ devices are a very convenient and well made and safe device for home use. Patient can be instructed how to light and extinguish them safely, and how to use them.

 

 

 

So there it is. A range of convenient warming techniques for the modern acupuncture practice. Pick up the phone and call your local acupuncturist to discuss whether this treatment might be for you.

Warning: Moxa treatment should only be used under the guidance of a fully qualified traditional acupuncturist. It should not be carried out at home without supervision.

Call Martin Dean on 07969413158 for an appointment.

My Body Has Held Me To Ransom

“I can’t believe my body has held me to ransom for all these years”.

This is a sentiment I have heard expressed in so many ways over the years. As a man it is often difficult to truly appreciate what a woman puts up with each month, particularly when things don’t go smoothly. As an experienced fertility acupuncturist though I have treated many many women with a large variety of menstrual difficulties over the years and I have to say the results are often profound. Of course you don’t have to be trying to get pregnant to get help with your cycle.

So how could acupuncture help? Before starting it is a great idea to seek a medical diagnosis so do have a talk with your GP first in order to rule out anything more serious. On your first visit to an acupuncturist you will be asked a whole lot of detailed questions about your menstrual and general health to establish what is behind your symptoms and how best to move forward.My Body Has Held Me To Ransom

I have come to regard the female menstrual cycle as something which needs to ‘flow’ smoothly. This means for example that the monthly blood flow should be smooth and fluid (so no clots) and free from ‘stop-start’ bleeding. You should be largely pain-free and emotionally consistent for the whole month (so no mood swings or energy drops). Any other symptoms that occur during your menstrual cycle such as bloating (bowels not flowing well) or fluid retention (impeded fluid flow) will be taken into account.

In some of my more poetic moments I am drawn to consider my role as a ‘plumber’, opening taps, removing blockages, turning up the water pressure and improving heat distribution. To translate this into ‘acupuncture speak’, one of the most common diagnoses is ‘Liver Qi Stagnation’ which has amongst its symptoms, moodiness, fluctuation of mental state, a churning feeling in the stomach and feeling ‘wound-up”. Does this sound familiar? Yes we are talking about PMS. Treating acupuncture point ‘Liver 3’ (located on the foot) during the premenstrual phase often produces the most dramatic treatment outcomes. It is like opening a tap.

So go on – get your life back!

Martin Dean

07969 41 31 58

 

 

 

 

 

 

Connecting With Your Inner Sherlock

When  people attend their initial acupuncture session, we will not surprisingly have a long conversation about their health. Although there will be a list of questions to ask, with experience these can be used to give structure to the session and not to hinder the flow of the dialogue. The chat may meander from bowel habits to ‘get up and go’, from dry skin to the death of a parent. Often when I pause to ask how things are proceeding the answer is  something like “I’ve never really thought about it in that context before”. The point here is that we are encouraged to think of our health as manifesting in small unconnected parcels. We are unused to considering such issues as being joined up, one to another.
image

To take an example:-
“I have a back problem which has nagged me on and off for three years. My GP says it is just wear and tear and offers me painkillers. These simply mask the problem. Osteopathic treatment is helpful for a while but I have to keep going back for more. My acupuncturist asked me when it all started and I immediately went back to the time when I lost my job three and a half years ago. I was sick with worry for several months afterwards and that is when it started I think. Although I eventually got another job, I haven’t slept well since. I’m beginning to think these things are all connected”.

This patient had never thought of joining up the dots, and no other health professional had encouraged her to do this. As a result of our discussion acupuncture treatment was given to address the sleeping issues, calm her mind and strengthen her back. Her symptoms began to ease and she felt like the woman she thought she had lost.

So what are the keys to connecting with your inner Sherlock Holmes? My suggestion would be to construct a timeline and write down the key experiences in your life. Include health challenges, life changing moments such as getting divorced or having children, and anything else you can think of. If appropriate draw arrows to show things may be connected. Does anything new jump out at you?

Then focus on some of your current symptoms – for example PMS or fatigue. Do you know what makes it worse or what eases it? Are your headaches improved or worsened when you massage the affected area? What do you think you need to do to change things? Not only will this help your GP, acupuncturist or other health professional to accurately diagnose and treat your condition, it will help you to feel more in tune with the workings of your body.

Why not get talking to your inner Sherlock right now?