10 Minute Interludes

The opposing Chinese principles of yin and yang may be superficially familiar to us but how is this of use in the modern age? In the context of our daily ritual, yang may be expressed as the doing part of each day, whilst yin (which in written Chinese literally depicts the shady side of a hill) represents the not doing. It reminds us that we should take time out during our day to do nothing – to preserve the balance between yin and yang. Failure to do this could lead to mental and physical exhaustion. Why not program in an ’empty 10 minute interlude’ in your day? Sit and watch the world go by or take a real look at the skyline.

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Tapping To Boost Performance

Researchers at Staffordshire University are leading research into a technique which involves tapping acupressure points on the head and hands – so-called emotional freedom technique – to boost performance under pressure. In a trial they studied 39 patients and found that most of them improved significantly in a wide variety of conditions.
One participant said ” I would describe the impact of these sessions like emotional first aid, it would allow me to refocus when I found myself hitting a bad patch”.

 

Tapping could improve performance under pressure.

Tapping to improve performance

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Quiet Reflection

The Chinese concept of yin and yang may be superficially familiar to us but let us take a closer look at these ancient ideas. Whilst yang may be viewed as the active part of our waking day, the written Chinese character for yin literally depicts the shady side of a hill. It reminds us that we should take time out during our day to do nothing, to preserve the balance between yin and yang. Failure to do this can lead to mental and physical exhaustion. Why not program in an ’empty 10 minute pause’ in your day? Sit and watch the world go by.

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