A New Way To Pay Your Acupuncturist

In the last few years the way we carry out financial transactions has changed beyond recognition. Contactless cards, on-line banking, paperless transactions, ping-it, bitcoin etc. The list is seemingly endless.A New Way To Pay Your Acupuncturist

According to Payments UK 500m personal cheques were written in 2015, and though banks are now promising to process them for as long as they are needed, this total was 13% lower than in 2014. They are still a popular way of paying tradespeople, charities and friends/family.

So enter the newcomer – paym. This works by linking your mobile number to your bank account. Simple. There’s no annoying sort codes or account numbers and because you get it straight from your bank or building society, it’s safe and straightforward.

So here’s how to pay a small business or individual using paym (assuming they are set up to receive payments as described above).
According to paym.co.uk ‘to send a payment, just log in to your existing mobile banking or payment app. Select a friend’s number using your contacts or enter a mobile number manually. No sort code or account number needed. Enter the amount you want to pay. Paym lets you check the name of the person you’re paying, so you can be sure you’re sending it to the right place. Confirm the name of the person you are paying, press send and your app will confirm your payment has been sent straight away’.Simple and easy.
 Paym, a new way to pay your acupuncturist.

Martin Dean is an acupuncturist with over 23 years practice experience who practices in Nottingham. As a forward thinking small business owner he is pleased to accept paym transactions.

. www.acupuncturepaincentre.co.uk

The Four Pillars of Health

What are the four pillars of health and how can they help us? Dr Rangan Chatterjee, 38, a GP from Oldham, and presenter of the BBC’s ‘Doctor In The House’ series was recently interviewed on the BBC Breakfast TV sofa. He asserted that most GPs these days are too busy to properly investigate complicated medical conditions, and it is therefore much easier to prescribe a pill. As part of his TV experiment Dr Chatterjee was allowed the luxury of spending time with patients in their home environment. As a consequence he was better able to get to the bottom of their medical issues, with some heartwarming outcomes.Four pillars of health

The four pillars he described are:-

  • Eating
  • Moving
  • Sleeping
  • Relaxing

It all sounds too easy, but what can we really learn from this approach? We are bombarded with health messages on a daily basis. Which ones should we really pay attention to? Let us take a look at each pillar in turn.

Nearly every day there is a new story in the media about healthy eating, which frankly can be really confusing. For me the key questions are about how often you eat freshly cooked food? Perhaps convenience wins over quality. Are do you allow adequate time to ‘rest and digest’ at mealtimes?

Have you ever had a conversation with your GP or practice nurse about taking more exercise? What was the outcome? Perhaps you started with good intentions but something more important came along.

four pillars of healthAnd on the topic of rest, the sleep council (http://www.sleepcouncil.org.uk/) notes that ‘nearly half of us are getting just six hours sleep or less a night. And an alarming four out of five people complain of disturbed or inadequate – or ‘toxic’ – sleep’. Go to their website for answers to these and other sleep related issues.

According to an online dictionary, the word relax means ‘to make or become less tense or anxious, to make (a rule or restriction) less strict’. Which rule could you relax? For all you schedulers out there, do you ever pencil in R & R breaks?

Here is a tip to make your four pillars work for you. I like to score each one from one to ten (where ten is perfect), and then write alongside each score one action I can take that will improve my score. Go on and have a go.

Martin Dean is an acupuncturist with over 23 years practice experience who practices in Nottingham. www.acupuncturepaincentre.co.uk